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Calendar plot shiny app and dynamic UI

Calendar plot shiny app using dynamic UI.

In my previous post, I created a calendar planner plot using ggplot2. I wanted to take it further and create a shiny app for it. This was more of a shiny learning exercise rather than a purpose-driven app. Specifically, creating dynamic user inputs and retrieving data from these inputs.

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Calendar plot with ggplot2

Creating an availability calendar plot using ggplot2 in R.

So, someone asked me about my summer time availability at work. I realized that my availability was a bit complex and perhaps it was easier to sent a figure/diagram rather than explaining it in 200 words. That’s where I thought of the idea of creating an availability calendar using ggplot2. The idea is to show basically three categories: available, not available and a limited period (where I am not available in person, but can read emails).

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Customising ggplot2

Customising a ggplot2 plot using the theme function.

In this post, we are going to explore how to adjust various ggplot plot elements. What can be adjusted, what they are called and how they can be adjusted.

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Photo calender using R

Create an elegant photo calendar completely using R.

I had this idea of using some of my travel photos to create a photo calendar. I would normally go about it using Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Illustrator. But, that would involve a lot of manual work placing dates and days for each month. I would also like to mark some public holidays and friend’s birthdays. So, I wondered if it might be possible to do it with R. After fiddling about with it over the weekend, I managed to make it work. It went better than I expected. And here I am recreating the calendar using some stock photos. All stock photos are royalty-free from Pexels. For the impatient ones, the whole code and images are available at this Github repository. For detailed guide, keep reading.

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Humanity has never lived in better times

It is easy to be disillusioned and pessimistic about the world we live in. Bad news seems to be followed by worse news. But humanity has come a long way from the disease-ridden, impoverished, war-torn lives of our fore-fathers. Here we look at a few data-driven graphs to convince ourselves of the progress we have made over time in various aspects of life. Slow progress never makes headlines.

It may seem like the world is descending into total chaos, violence, and destruction. War in Syria, Ukraine, Yemen, Islamic state, migrant crisis, Ebola, plane crashes, earthquakes, tsunamis and what-not. The more news you watch, the more worried you will be. This is because the news outlets tend to focus on spectacularly negative instances. Violence, atrocities, and hatred are thrown into the spotlight and into the lives of common people. With the ever increasing digital connectivity, it is easy to disseminate information and to absorb information at an unprecedented level. Relatively smaller incidents have a larger voice. As said by Ray Kurzwil, “The world isn’t getting worse, our information is getting better”. To appreciate the world we live in, we have to put things into a wider context.

The fact is that humanity has never lived in a better time than now in pretty much every aspect you look at; war, violence, diseases, poverty are all at the lowest it has ever been. Of course, there is still a long way to go, but this is the best it has been since the beginning of humankind. To prove my point, here we evaluate human progress using some real data and simple time-series plots. Most of the data and information was obtained from OurWorldInData.

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